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I told my writing buddy about the new anthology launch – at the Sun pub in Drury Lane, near Covent Garden – London, you know – on Saturday 16th December (4.30-7.30pm) – why not come along and see what’s on offer?

I said, they’ve described my writing as ‘modern noir’, whadcha think of that? She said, it sounds like the name of a paint. I’ll wear tweed, and a black raincoat, and brown leather shoes (which my father warned me against when I was quite young).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seems to me it sounds more like the name of a dark chocolate, but hey, as long as you enjoy watching it dry!

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So the BBC had their man interview Tom Hanks yesterday, about his new collection of Short Stories (power to the man!)…but asked him how he felt about becoming ‘ a novelist’. Shades of Muhammed Ali – what’s my name? – but no blows rained sadly.

Today they topped it off with a decent short story on Radio 4 ….and you’ve guessed it….. ‘by the novelist…’

When will these people learn?

 

 

 

 

 

Here’s a date for those of you in or near Carlisle, England: At Darren Harper’s Phil and Lit Society, Room 8, Fisher Street Galleries, Friday, 3rd November 7.00pm-8.30  English Short Stories between the Wars… a talk by Me (with help from BHD), looking at A.E.Coppard, H.E.Bates, V.S.Pritchett and others. (£4.50 members, £6 non-members). Book through website https://www.darrenharper.net/

In the midst of this unexpectedly re-kindled interest in my Valanga form, here are the first and third examples I wrote. The first, of course, is where the name came from:

The Avalanche

We cannot speak.

Our past is spoken for.

So we must keep our silences.

 

Don’t catch my eye.

We cannot speak,

and I will only look away.

Our past is spoken for.

There is no more to say.

So we must keep our silences.

 

Nothing will change.

Don’t catch my eye.

We have resolved to wait.

We cannot speak.

The distance is too great,

and I will only look away

across the field of years.

Our past is spoken for,

in forests where we lay.

There is no more to say.

I love you now as then.

So we must keep our silences.

 

Our love endures.

Nothing will change.

Only illusions fail.

Don’t catch my eye

while listening to this tale.

We have resolved to wait,

and you were always true.

We cannot speak

about this love we share.

The distance is too great.

Besides here’s not the place,

and I will only look away

to see you in imagination

across the field of years

with tears upon your face.

Our past is spoken for,

and we do not forget,

in forests where we lay,

on paths we walked together.

There is no more to say.

Make no mistake.

I love you now as then.

It’s only hearts we break,

and we must keep our silences.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marooned

And I no longer look for ships.

We passed in darkness not in light

Where love falls unexpected in the night.

 

It seems so long ago,

And I no longer look for ships,

And leave the beacon fire unlit.

We passed in darkness not in light.

It’s pain that time from memory strips,

Where love falls unexpected in the night.

 

All loss lies in the past.

It seems so long ago,

And time slips by so fast,

And I no longer look for ships,

But sit with closed eyes on the beach,

And leave the beacon fire unlit.

The past is always out of reach.

We passed in darkness not in light.

Who learns the lesson this would teach?

It’s pain that time from memory strips,

Until we are alone at last

Where love falls unexpected in the night.

 

So keep the vigil on your side.

All loss lies in the past

Among the ones whom love divides.

It seems so long ago

We made our separate trips,

And time slips by so fast.

We’ve no regrets at all,

And I no longer look for ships

(There is no rescue yet)

But sit with closed eyes on the beach

To see what I recall,

And leave the beacon fire unlit

In case you see its signal flame.

The past is always out of reach,

And all fires burn the same.

We passed in darkness not in light,

But yesterday still grips.

Who learns the lesson this would teach?

By candle glow and lovers’ talk,

It’s pain that time from memory strips,

Beyond the sound of human speech,

Until we are alone at last.

I would be there if yet I might,

Where love falls unexpected in the night.

 

 

No Valangas here, but a collection of poems written overlooking Ullswater, and including the Ullswater Requiem.

 

 

 

Darren Harper, founder of Carlisle (England)’s new Phil & Lit society, invite BHDandMe to talk to him about short stories. Here’s the first instalment of what got asked, and what got answered. 

 

 

 

Some of the ideas touched on in the interview are examined in The Poetic Impulse, by Mike Smith.

Here’s early warning of a new Showcase title due out soon, published by Inktears, including a fistful of stories from BHD:  Click on the cover to go to their preview page and sign up for a copy on publication, or click here

Short stories occupy time and place. These can be locations as precise as a specific street corner on the stroke of noon on a particular, or as vague as there and then, but they are the ‘there and when’ of how stories happen. We talk of stories ‘taking place’, and often that place is crucial to the story being able to ‘take place’ at all. The timing too can be critical in how a story unfolds. There’s a many a story set before the days of mobile phones which would be simply unbelievable in an age of instant communications without elaborate, and perhaps unconvincing plot devices – ‘a funny thing happened to me on the day my mobile battery ran out’.

I’ll be looking at when and where stories come from and might be going to in a workshop for Darren Harper‘s Carlisle Phil and Lit Society, in room 8, Fisher Street Galleries, Carlisle, on Thursday 12th of October, 7.00pm to 9.00pm. Course Fee: £10 Booking: To book a place on the course, or to find out more, please contact Darren at darrenharper.esq@gmail.com

Writing buddy, Marilyn Messenger and I [Ambiguous Encounters, ten short stories by Marilyn Messenger and Brindley Hallam Dennis] will be reading as part of the Borderlines Showcase event at Carlisle Cathedral Fratry on Saturday evening, 7th October. Tickets are free. We have two more pairs of back-to-back stories, written individually but posing, and answering questions of each other. That’s Carlisle, England, by the way, for blog readers beyond these borders!

Word just in from the Carlisle Borderlines festival is that my writing workshop on Thursday (5th October), has been cancelled. There must be an appropriate quotation for this….

and thanks for all the fish…..The Hitch-Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy

“Et s’il etait a refaire/Je referais ce chemin” …..Louis Aragon

Let us go then, you and I……T.S.Eliot

For this relief, much thanks …Hamlet

Frankly my dear, I don’t give a damn! ……Gone With The Wind

And they all lived happily ever after…..anon

 

I’d love to see some more….(but in any case, if you were thinking of it, remember not to turn up!)

You might pick up on some of the ideas that the workshop was planned to explore in The Poetic Impulse, a wee book on the problems of writing the short story: 

I have very little left, in a physical sense, of my parents.

Among the mementos was, once upon a time, a Penny Spitfire. It sparked the writing of my novella of the same name (published by Pewter Rose press), and promptly, after that publication, detached itself from my jacket and passed on – much like the one in the story. I have other relics of my dad’s part in the Second World War.

   One is a piece of metal work, which, he told me, was his exam piece for recognition as a ‘craftsman’ in the RAF. It’s not much to look at, but look carefully and you will see that it required a host of metalworking skills to make and assemble. I have considered cleaning it, and trying to take it apart. If it’s as well made as it looks it should assemble and disassemble neatly – but it is a lifetime old, and probably set in its ways.

My father was taught to write in a copperplate hand, but not to express himself in words. His two surviving wartime diaries – tiny books with tiny writing inside them – are not especially descriptive or revealing about his years in India.

But they are potently expressive, not so much for what they do say, as what they don’t – and the way that cursive, flowing script, turned to chiselled capitals as the war, and his exile from all that he had been brought up to know, went on. It’s interesting with diaries – and perhaps with notebooks (even computer generated ones) – to consider whether the writer is primarily talking to his descendants, to the wider world, or to him, or her, self.

There was a wicked little device used in the Middle Ages (and later), to cripple cavalry horses.  I think it was called a caltrop. Thrown onto the ground it was so constructed as to fall always sharp side up. A three dimensional piece, you might imagine it as having a triangular base, from which three other triangles rise to that upward pointing sharpie.

The triangle as a metaphor for story – characters at the point, relationships along the lines, is a two dimensional object, but we could add that third dimension to it as well. That would be the narrator. But where is the author? Where is the reader (or listener, if the story is being told)?

Why not come along on Thursday 5th October to Mike Smith’s Facets of Fiction Workshop at Carlisle Library (10.00am-12.00 noon) and join in an exploration of this and other triangular conundrums about how we write short stories, and what we think they might be.  Tickets are available via the link, here.